“Spice Up Your Life” Isn’t About What You Think It Is, And You’ll Never Listen The Same Way Again

It’s been over two decades since the Spice Girls made their debut, but almost every 90s kid still has at least one of the group’s tracks on their playlist. Even if you don’t, you can’t help but belt out “Tell me what you want, what you really really want” every single time “Wannabe” comes on.

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The iconic British girl group embodied everything that the decade was about, and released songs that were quintessential 90s. Their success and charm a.k.a Spice Mania saw no limit, with critics even comparing them to The Beatles.

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Following the success of their debut album, Spice, the pop group released a movie and their second album, Spiceworld, in 1997, and it sold over 20 million copies worldwide. It spawned plenty of singles that proved the girls weren’t just one-hit wonders and they were here to stay.

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Spiceworld also gave us the gem that is the wild and catchy “Spice Up Your Life,” an anthem for 90s kids all over the world. The song, which the girls wanted to be a “song for the world,” incorporated dance pop and Latin influenced beats, and drew influences from Bollywood films. It didn’t receive critical acclaim like the group’s previous singles did, but fans (who are the ones that really matter) couldn’t get enough of it.

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The futuristic music video was inspired by the 1982 Blade Runner movie, and it perfectly complemented the charmingly chaotic tune, which was recorded as quickly as possible in between filming scenes for the group’s movie, Spice World.

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However, there’s one thing about the song that even the most loyal fans may not know.

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Turns out the lyrics we’ve been singing this whole time allegedly mean something entirely different than we thought.

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While “Spice Up Your Life” sounds like the Spice Girls are calling for “every boy and every girl” to smile, dance, and have a good time, there are some people on the internet that believe that the song’s true meaning is a far cry from what we all think.

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In case you needed to jog your memory, here’s the badass music video:

Not that you need it, but here are some of the lyrics:

La la la la la la la la la/ La la la la la la la/ La la la la la la la la la /La la la la la la la/ When you’re feelin’ sad and low /We will take you where you gotta go /Smilin’, dancin’, everything is free /All you need is positivity/ Colours of the world /Spice up your life /Every boy and every girl /Spice up your life / People of the world /Spice up your life Aah / Slam it to the left/ If you’re havin’ a good time/ Shake it to the right/ If ya know that you feel fine / Chicas to the front/ Ha ha (uh uh)/ Go round

Now, they seem very innocent, right? Well, I hate to break it to you, but according to a theory circulating the web, the lyrics are actually about drugs.

Yes, you read that right. The song supposedly contains instructions for cooking crystal meth, and the lyrics “Slam it to the left” and Shake it to the right” are steps in the meth-cooking process. You might want to stop right now to take this all in before you continue reading.

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The song was played during a key scene in the third season of Breaking Bad, and proponents of this theory use this to support their argument. The Spice Girls and the songwriters they worked with never bothered to comment on this theory, but we hope for our sake that they will issue an explanation someday.

It seems that some people are just set out to ruin our innocence-filled childhoods. First “The Macarena” and now this? Sigh. I don’t  think we’ll be able to listen to the song the same way again knowing what we now know.

Are you just as shocked as we are about this?

[H/T: Yearbookoffice.com]

Emma C
Freelance Writer